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The Mozart Effect

 

        What is the Mozart Effect?

        Improving Auditory Function

        Things to Consider

        Things to Avoid

        Related Topics

 

What is the Mozart Effect?

Note: I do not recommend the Tomatis method for left-handed people. For more information please see the section The Tomatis Method on the Cross Dominance page.

"Research with Mozart's music began in France in the late 1950s when Dr. Alfred Tomatis began his experiments in auditory stimulation for children with speech and communication disorders. By 1990, there were hundreds of centers throughout the world using Mozart's music containing high frequencies, especially the violin concertos and symphonies, to help children with

        Dyslexia,

        Speech disorders, and

        Autism.

        In the 1990's experiments were begun at the University of California in Irvine with Mozart's music and spatial intelligence assessments.

         As recently as 2001, new studies in England use Mozart's music to study its effect on epilepsy."

What is the Mozart Effect?

 

Improving Auditory Function

        Laterality: Correcting Ear Dominance: Good Quality Input

 

Things to Consider

Hypersensitive Hearing, Hyperacusis

Although people with hyperacusis are sensitive to higher frequency sounds, less-high frequency sounds may help to stimulate auditory function.

The level of high frequencies can be adjusted using a treble control or a graphic equalizer.

 

Things to Avoid

Certain Music Compilations

There are musical compilations for sale which claim that they boost your brain power or that they help to achieve the Mozart effect. However, some of them contain selections which tend to increase anxiety, such as some of Mozart's piano concertos.

"Some people are hyper-responsive to sound, and music can distract them during study. Others learn how to select music for their different moods and projects. Generally, the challenge to study comes when we are overstimulated and cannot settle down to focus or we are dull, tired, or bored and cannot get the energy to begin a task."

What is the Mozart Effect?

 

Related Topics

        Hearing: Low Frequency Noise

        Hearing: PC Noise

        Hearing: Sound Sensitivity

        Hearing: Sound Sensitivity: Hyperacusis

         Hearing

 

 

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